Search Site

speakers

keynote speakers

 

Dr Hana O'Regan

Dr Hana O’Regan (Kāi Tahu, Kāti Māmoe, Waitaha) is the General Manager of Oranga/ Wellbeing for Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu.

Hana’s career has been largely focused on the areas of Māori language revitalisation and Māori educational achievement whilst also being an active advocate and driver for her own tribal language revitalisation strategy within Kāi Tahu.

Click here to read more

Dr Hana O'Regan

Helen Leahy

Helen Leahy is the Pouārahi / Chief Executive of Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu; the Whānau Ora Commissioning Agency for the South Island. Helen returned to the South Island in 2015 after 25 years in Wellington.

For the previous fifteen years Helen was based at Parliament in Wellington, in her roles as Chief of Staff of the Māori Party, and Senior Ministerial Advisor for Dame Hon Tariana Turia.   She was National Secretary for the Māori Party from its establishment in 2004 to 2014; and the author of ‘Crossing the Floor: the story of Tariana Turia” (2015).

Click here to read more

 

 
Helen Leahy

Professor Richie Poulton

Professor Richie Poulton is Director of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Research Unit which conducts the Dunedin longitudinal study, one of the most detailed studies of human health and development ever undertaken.

In 2007, he established and became a Co-Director of the National Centre for Lifecourse Research, a research centre based at the University of Otago in Dunedin, but with partners located at universities across New Zealand and internationally.

Click here to read more

Richie Poulton

Sue Bagshaw

Dr Sue Bagshaw works as a primary care doctor specialising in adolescent/youth health at a one stop community youth health centre for 10-25-year olds, which she helped to set up under a trust called Korowai Youth Well-being Trust. She is currently working with others to set up a Youth Hub of services, creativity and transition housing. Sue is a senior lecturer in adolescent health in the department of Paediatrics at the Christchurch School of Medicine, and an educator with the Collaborative Trust (a research and training centre for youth health and development, which she also helped to set up). Sue worked for the Family Planning Association for 20 years and worked ten years part time on the Methadone programme in Christchurch: which is why she has interests in common with young people – sex, drugs and rock ‘n roll!

Sue Bagshaw